Tailgating Ideas

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Team Bar Finder

Posted by Dave On September - 10 - 2016

Team Bar Finder Logo
There are times when you just can’t go tailgating. Normally those times are when your team is playing on the road and it is either too far or too expensive to support your team away from home. But one of the things we all love about tailgating is the camaraderie we share with other fans while out in the parking lot before the game. When watching the game on TV you lose that if you are alone or with a small group of people. That is why many fans like to get together with other fans at sports bars and root on their team together. But finding a bar that is local and is the designated watch party location of your favorite team is often times difficult. Unless you still live near the city of your favorite team, locating a bar that supports your out of town team was difficult. That is until now. Introducing Team Bar Finder.

Simply explained, a team bar is a sports bar that is typically outside of the local area of a particular team but is a friendly place to go for that team’s fans to congregate. Still confused? Check out this video taken inside Finnerty’s in New York City when the San Francisco Giants won the World Series.

Pretty crazy considering that bar is over 3,000 miles away from the City by the Bay. That bar is also packed on Sundays during football season with what else, San Francisco 49ers fans. So how does a fan from San Francisco living in New York or a LSU alumnus find a bar in Seattle show their game surrounded by other like-minded fans> Team Bar Finder.

Read the rest of this entry »

Three girls playing cornhole while camping

Cornhole has been a traditional favorite at fairs, backyards and tailgate parties for generations. It’s also a firm favorite at children’s parties. Although there is nothing wrong with the standard cornhole game rules, there are some non-traditional games that you can play with a cornhole board that will help to keep the kids interested, and that can help them burn off a few of those energy calories that come with eating all that great tailgate fare you have prepared.

Here are three variations on the traditional cornhole game that can help to keep your kids playing with those bean bags for hours.

Slip and Slide Shooter

For those warm summer days, this variation will have the kids running off that extra energy and staying cool at the same time. The game is suitable for children who are old enough to use a slip and slide. To play the game, set up a slip and slide, and then set up your board half way to a third of the way down the slide. Each child is given a bean bag at the top of the slide. The aim is to launch the cornhole bag and to land it on the board or in the hole as the children slide past the playing board. Normal game scoring can be used. You can also use a simple scoring system, like one point for each bag that lands on the board, if the children are younger. One of the parents will need to keep score.

This variation can also be played in teams, with children from each team taking turns. A team scoring system can be used to work out the winning team. This style of play is great for high energy levels, and it also encourages the hand-eye coordination of the children. It is, however, only suitable for outdoor events, hot days and summer activities. Probably not the best for a tailgate unless you tailgate on grass and have access to a hose and running water to keep the sliding surface wet and slippery.

Round the Clock

Another great take on an ordinary cornhole game is to use a timer instead of using the traditional point system. This round the clock cornhole can be played with one or two boards.

For the single board variation, set up the bean bag board at the twelve o’clock position and use a marker to indicate the shooting position. Mark out a circle using markers. Divide the children into teams. One team has a chance, and then the next team has a chance, and the team is timed.

Start with one bean bag at the foot of the board, and one bean bag at the first shooter. The shooter shoots the bean bag at the board, and then runs around the circle to the board. The bean bag is collected, and then the shooter runs around the rest of the circle clockwise and passes the bag to the next shooter. This encourages speed and accuracy for the children, and gives them time to run off all that tailgate party energy.

A two team version can be played with two bean bag boards, one board set up at six o’clock and one board set up at the 12 o’clock position of the circle. Each team is given 4 bean bags. One team is positioned at the 6 o’clock board and the other team starts out at the 12 o’clock board. The teams then throw their bags at the board on the opposite side of the clock – in other words, the team standing at six o’clock throws to the board positioned at 12 o’clock and vice versa.

Once the team has thrown its bags, they race around the circle and retrieve their bean bags and throw again – at the opposite board. The game can be timed – the winning team being the one who scored the most points in the allotted time, or it can be based on the team to reach a specific point total. All team members must race around the circle in a clockwise direction to avoid collisions.

Pass the Bag

This rendition uses two boards and two teams. Set out the boards opposite one another. Use some of the bean bags to mark off distances between the two boards. Divide the children into two teams.

Each team will have one shooter to begin with that stand at the boards ready to shoot. One child stands at the each marker between the boards. There is one bean bag for each team.

When the game starts, the shooter shoots the bag. A parent keeps score for each team. Once the shot is taken, the shooter runs to the end of the line. The child at the end of the line takes the bean bag and runs to the child at marker one, and then passes the bean bag to the child at marker one. The child from the end of the line then stays at marker one while the next child takes the bean bag up the line – it’s like a relay race.

The game ends when one team has had all the children throw the bag; for smaller children or for older children, the team with the most score wins.

Whether you are playing traditional cornhole, or a newer version, cornhole is sure to be fun for the whole family.

(This is a guest post written by Jennifer Cantis, content creator for Baggo. Baggo carries multiple variations of cornhole boards, bags and accessories. Jennifer has been a avid cornhole player for 11 years and doesn’t plan to stop until she is the cornhole champion of the world.)

Tailgating has come to Canada! (Sort of)

Posted by Dave On July - 8 - 2016
Toronto Argos Fan Tailgating

A Toronto Argonauts fan cooks on a grill during a tailgate party ahead of the team’s CFL season opener against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats in Toronto on Thursday, June 23, 2016. (Photo courtesy The Canadian Press/ Chris Young)

Canadian football fans can rejoice! Tailgating is not only allowed but encouraged at Toronto Argonauts games this season. Before you head to the beer aisle and buy the entire supply of Molson and Labatt Blue in preparation for this, you need to know something.

BYOB tailgating is still not allowed in Canada.

That’s not to say that you can’t have a frosty beverage while tailgating a Toronto Argonauts game – it is just going to cost you. You see, you can buy an overpriced and undersized beer from a BMO Field approved vendor, but bringing your own is not allowed. Leave your cooler at home and make sure to bring your wallet. And a good line of credit if you plan on having more than two.

Traditional American style tailgating in Canada has been non-existent due to the heavy restrictions on the consumption of alcohol in outdoor spaces. The Calgary Stampeders fans have tried to bring tailgating to the Canadian Football League but the fans can not overcome the existing laws across the Great White North. It’s not that you can’t have a tailgate party without alcohol. It’s just the fact that the Canadian government views their adult citizens as children that can’t handle the responsibility of consuming alcohol outside the confines of a bar or restaurant.

David Menzies of Rebel Media in Canada explains the hypocrisy of it all in this video rant:

David Menzies’ take on the situation is a bit more critical than the Canadian “mainstream” media. By going by the Canadian newspapers and blogs, you would think Toronto’s first season with tailgating mirrors that of a Buffalo Bills or Green Bay Packers tailgate.

CP24: Tailgating experience a hit with fans despite home opener loss for Argos
Hamilton News: Burgers, beers and beach chairs: Toronto tailgating experience a hit
York Region: Argos fans enjoy the tailgate experience
CBC: Argonauts fans celebrate start of the season with launch of tailgate parties
TSN: Tailgating coast to coast? Here’s hoping

With all that optimism, is Menzies the only critic? Probably not. But you need to keep in mind those dissenting voices may not be getting much publicity because the Canadian people have been lulled into believing their bureaucrats know better than they do.

I’d compare it to Soviet block countries that never knew what freedom and liberty was. If you only know standing in line to buy toilet paper or being pleasantly surprised when you can buy a ration of coffee, you really don’t know what you are missing. Same thing goes for the Canadians and BYOB tailgating. They will take what they can get but unless they have ventured south to an NFL game or even a college game, they don’t know what they are missing.

I would not be surprised if the Toronto Argos fans took in a Buffalo Bills game at Orchard Park, they would start demanding the bureaucrats start changing their laws.

Until the Canadian government wakes up and starts treating it’s adult citizens, well, like adults, they may have to resort to childish behaviors to get around these oppressive laws. We’d suggest checking out these Beer Can Covers for sale or the wide selection of Sneaky Flasks to disguise your hooch while tailgating up north.

Drive for Uber & Lyft to supplement your tailgating habit

Posted by Dave On April - 15 - 2016

Uber and Lyft logos

By now you are probably familiar with Uber and Lyft; two transportation companies that allow passengers with smartphones to submit a trip request which is then routed to drivers who use their own cars essentially as taxis.

What if I told you you can earn some extra money in your spare time driving for Uber and/or Lyft in order to help finance that tailgating habit of yours that can be quite expensive?

If you are unfamiliar with both Uber and Lyft, we’ll let their Wikipedia pages speak to them and what they are all about.

Wikipedia – Uber

Wikipedia – Lyft

If you have never used Uber or Lyft, here are some coupon codes for free rides using either Uber or Lyft.

Lyft rider free $50 credits

Lyft – $50 in free ride credits – Scan the QR code above or click on it or click HERE to claim your $50 in free rides from Lyft.

Uber coupon for free ride up to $15

Uber – Get your first ride free (up to $15 maximum) – Scan the QR code above or click on it or click HERE to get your first ride for free up to $15. (*Free ride value amounts vary by city.)

Both promotions through Uber and Lyft only apply if you are a first time user of Uber and/or Lyft. If you have already requested and taken at least one ride with Uber and/or Lyft, you are not eligible for the free coupons. The good news is if you have friends or family that have never take Uber or Lyft, pass those coupon codes along to them and they can get free rides themselves.

Drive with Uber / Drive with Lyft

Now that we gotten the free ride coupons out of the way, let’s jump to how you can make some money and also provide some hints and tips on earning more on your very first trip.

Right now, Uber is offering a $750 bonus for drivers who sign up and complete 75 rides WITHIN 30 DAYS. 75 rides may seem like a large number but 75 rides is quite easy to achieve. To sign up to drive with Uber, click HERE.

Because I am based in Orange County, Calif., Lyft is offering a $750 bonus to new Orange County drivers who complete 75 rides in their first 30 days. To sign up to drive with Lyft, click HERE.

(The bonus structure for Lyft varies from city to city and they sometimes will adjust it up or down based on driver supply and rider demand. An example is those who want to drive in San Francisco can earn a $1,000 bonus and need to complete 100 rides in 30 days. New drivers in Columbus, Ohio can earn a $150 bonus while only giving 30 rides in 30 days. Check out the Referral Rewards for Lyft Drivers page to see if Lyft is in your city and what the bonus structure and requirements are for your area.)

If you are a tailgater, you probably have your own car. That’s the first step towards driving for Uber and Lyft. Your vehicle needs to have at least four doors and be in good condition. In addition to having your own vehicle, you need to be 21 years of age or older and have a smart phone. Uber and Lyft requests come to drivers via a mobile app so it is recommended to have an iPhone 4s or newer or Android 2013 or newer.

In order to be approved by Uber and Lyft, you will need to have a clean driving record and pass a criminal and personal background check. Your vehicle will also undergo a safety inspection to ensure your vehicle is safe and presentable.

After you are approved, you are ready to hit the road and start earning money.

Lyft driver referral code

Lyft driver referral code

To start driving with Lyft, scan the above QR code with your smart phone or click HERE.

Uber driver referral code

Uber driver referral code

To start driving with Uber, scan the above QR code or click HERE.

Some Uber and Lyft drivers have reported they earn an average of $1,500 per week. This varies based on the number of hours they drive and which days they choose to drive but the opportunity to make some money is out there. Even driving part-time on your schedule, you can earn some extra beer money or money to take a road trip or buy some new tailgating gear.

If you do end up driving for Uber and/or Lyft, here are some hints and tips:

  • You can drive for both companies. With Uber and Lyft, you are an independent contractor and are free to work for both companies. Both companies do not deduct taxes from your payments so it is your responsibility to save a portion of your earnings when filing your taxes. You will be given a 1099 form for tax purposes and therefore you are eligible to work for both companies.
  • Speaking of taxes, you can write off a portion of your gasoline and maintenance costs if you drive for Uber and Lyft. Since gassing up is needed in order to give rides, the IRS views gasoline as a business expense. Same thing goes for oil changes, new tires and even car washes and auto detailing. We are not tax attorneys so we would suggest consulting with someone who has more knowledge than us to know exactly what portion of these costs can be written off your taxes.
  • You can have both apps open at the same time. When a Lyft rider request comes through and you accept it, turn off Uber. Same goes after you accept an Uber request. You want to turn the other app off so that your acceptance rate does not suffer. Both Uber and Lyft encourage their drivers to maintain a rider request acceptance rate at or above 90%. Turning off the other app when on another ride will ensure a request will not come through that you have to ignore and thus affecting your acceptance rate with that company.
  • Lyft allows for passengers to give tips directly within the app. Uber does not have a tipping function within the app. If a Lyft passenger chooses to tip a driver, 100% of that tip amount is passed on to the driver and Lyft does not take a percentage.
  • Keep your car clean both inside and out. Passengers getting into a dirty car are less likely to tip and will probably give you a lower star rating than had your vehicle been clean and presentable.
  • Understand that when accepting a ride request, you will be routed to wherever that passenger is located. It may be at a house or a business and you may have to drive a few minutes to pick them up. You do not earn money on your way to pick up the passenger but the clock starts ticking and you start earning money as soon as you pick them up.
  • Fares are based on total miles and total minutes during a ride. Longer mileage and the more time spent means a higher payout to you. Even if you are sitting in traffic or at a stop light, you are getting paid to give that ride. The mileage and minute rates vary between the companies so make sure you know how much they pay.
  • There are no set hours when driving for Uber and Lyft. You can drive early morning or late at night or anytime in between. It is up to you to determine how much or how little you want to drive. You turn on the app when you want to earn extra money and turn it off when it is not a convenient time. It is truly a job where you set your own hours and are your own boss.
  • When picking up a passenger, you will not know where they are going until you confirm they are picked up. They might be going to the airport which is 90 minutes away or they might be going a half mile from the super market to their home and do not want to walk carrying all their bags. You never know where you are going to end up until the passenger gets in your car. Make sure that if you have an appointment during the day, you budget enough time to be able to get there based on wherever you end up. Turn off your app about an hour prior to your appointment time to ensure you are not too far away and can not make it in time.

There are plenty of other hints and tips to driving with Lyft and Uber but those are the basics to get you started. We are considering doing a “How to be an Uber/Lyft Driver” video in the future. Be on the look out for that.

If you are ready to start earning some extra money with both Uber and Lyft, there is very little stopping you. If you meet the above criteria and you and your vehicle pass all the checks, you can be earning money right away. The get driving with Uber and Lyft and start earning bonuses, click the link below:

Drive with Lyft

Drive with Uber

Top 10 posts of 2015

Posted by Dave On December - 30 - 2015

They say that if a friendship can last seven years, it will last a lifetime. So what does that say about a tailgating lifestyle blog that is now eight years old? I guess we are in it for the long haul. With more fun stuff to come in 2016, we are excited to see what the new year will bring.

But before we launch head first into 2016, we’d like to look back at 2015. Every year we like to take a look back on the year that was and share the most popular blog posts from the year expiring. With just a few more days left in 2015, we had a number of posts that were quite popular and generated a bit of interest and readership.

Here is the list of the Top 10 most popular post on TailgatingIdeas.com in 2015.

(Rankings based on web traffic analytics and number of page views for a particular post.)
The Coolest Cooler comes in three colors

10. The Coolest Cooler

It is not often you get to review one of the products that was the subject of one of the most highly successful and well funded Kickstarter campaigns, but we did. Sporting a built-in blender, Bluetooth music speaker, magnetic bottle opener, an LED light and so many more features jammed packed into a functional cooler, this product was one of the best we have seen not only in 2015 but in the past eight years of tailgating. Published in the end of November, had this review been published earlier in the year, this post would have ranked higher due to the overwhelming response and high traffic coming in via social media shares. The original post can be found here: The Coolest Cooler

Slick Shotz Kit

Slick Shotz Kit

9. Slick Shotz New & Improved

When it comes to smuggling booze into events, you need to stay one step ahead of the security guards. Slick Shotz did just that in improving their product to include a better heat sealer and built-in funnels on the shot packs. The original post can be found here: Slick Shotz – New and Improved

College Football Tailgating Lot

8. Five reasons modern tailgating is awesome

Everyone likes things that are more modern. This post details why tailgating in the 21st Century is way better than the old days. The original post can be found here:
Modern tailgating is awesome – Here’s 5 reasons why

Bacon wrapped Oreos

Photo courtesy of The Huffington Post

7. The Six Craziest Tailgating Foods on the Planet

From Bacon Wrapped Oreos to Cowboy Caviar to Insanely Hot Chicken Wings, our writer Dan Stern detailed the The 6 craziest tailgating foods on the planet. No wonder it was one of the top visited blog posts in 2015.

Freedom Grill Tailgating Grill Hot Girl

6. The Freedom Grill Making a Comeback?

Everyone loved the Freedom Grill and the Margaritaville Tailgating Grill. Unfortunately both are extinct and no longer being manufactured. When we started hearing rumblings through the grapevine that a possible return of the workhorse tailgating grill was on the horizon, we shared those rumors with our readers. Based on the fact that this post ranked No. 6 in our most popular posts, you can understand that there still is a demand for these grills and a hopefulness they will be coming out of retirement sooner than later. The original post can be found here: Freedom Grill making a come back?

Drinking Jacket Features

5. The Drinking Jacket

A victim of being posted in November and having less than two months of web traffic, our review of The Drinking Jacket broke into the Top 5 of the most popular posts in 2015. Shared extensively on social media, this “Tailgate Approved” product was bound to be a highly popular post had it been published earlier in the year.

Naked pong three sheets

4. Naked Pong

Did someone say Strip Beer Pong? Anytime you combine a popular tailgating game with a way to get your opponents to take off some clothing, you have a winning blog post. The original post can be found here: Naked Pong

Pelican Cooler Featured

3. Pelican Elite Coolers

A high quality cooler that has outstanding ice retention will always catch the eyes of tailgaters. Our review from March was quite popular with numerous people sharing it via social media. The original post can be found here: Pelican Elite Coolers

Stubbs_prize_package_2

2. Stubb’s Recipe Contest Finalist

As you might imagine, anytime there is an online vote to win cash and prizes, that will generate a lot of interest. Coming in at the No. 2 most popular and most visited blog post is the Stubb’s Recipe Contest Finalists. Shared nearly 2,000 times on social media, this was one contest that definitely generated a buzz about grill and tailgating.

Beer pong distraction boob cleavage

Photo courtesy of theCHIVE

1. Top Beer Pong Distractions for Tailgating

Beer Pong is rapidly becoming a serious threat to cornhole as the most popular tailgating game in the parking lot. Because of that, we thought it a public service to publish the Top Beer Pong Distractions for Tailgating. As you can tell, apparently two attractive ladies showing off some ample cleavage not only distracts beer pong players but reels in plenty of web traffic making it our top blog post of 2015.

So that’s a wrap on 2015. Did any of your favorite blog posts from the past year make in? If not, share with us in the comments below you favorite TailgatingIdeas.com blog post from 2015.

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About Me

TailgatingIdeas.com is a tailgating blog dedicated to bringing you the latest and most intriguing tailgating ideas out there. Whether it is the latest tailgating gear reviews, a great new recipe or a funny list to make you smile, our goal is to inform and entertain the avid and the casual tailgater alike.

Started in August 2007 by tailgating enthusiast Dave Lamm, TailgatingIdeas.com has evolved into an advocate for tailgaters rights and is not afraid to touch on controversial issues confronting those who frequent the tailgating parking lots.

To learn more about TailgatingIdeas.com and our team of writers, reviewers, cartoonists and contributors, please visit the About Us page.