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Shotgunit Lips

Posted by Dave On August - 22 - 2016ADD COMMENTS

Shotgunit Lips Girl

10 days. You only have 10 days before the official kickoff of the college football season. With college football inevitably comes college football tailgating. And college football tailgating almost always includes shotgunning. If you go to a college football tailgate and someone isn’t shotgunning, you probably have walked into a weak tailgate and you need to evacuate immediately.

Old fashioned shotgunning beers can be fun but there is some inherent dangers to it. The first danger is poking the hole in the bottom sidewall of the can. Most people use a sharp object like a knife, car key, screwdriver, etc. A lot of times while puncturing the hole, the object can go all the way through or glance off and injure your hand or wrist. Not fun making a trip to the ER rather than going to the game later.

Then after the hole has been made, there comes the danger of sharp edges on the cut aluminum can. The previously mentioned objects used to puncture the can don’t make a clean hole and often times leave behind shards of aluminum that could cut your lips while drinking. Also not fun to leave the tailgate in order to get some stitches after cutting your mouth open. There has to be a better way that allows you to get a big enough hole into your can without injuring yourself yet allowing you to “rapidly rehydrate”.

We were recently introduced to Shotgunit Lips. Shotgunit Lips are lip-shaped devices made of FDA-approved plastic. The beveled punch shaft safely punctures a standard-sized beverage can and you place your lips on the plastic lips and the liquid rushes into your mouth just as if your mouth was directly on the can. See the video for a demonstration:

(Disclaimer: We received a sample of Shotgunit Lips free of charge. The fact this sample was provided to us for free in no way influenced our opinion of the product nor did it impact our ability to test and review the product fairly and objectively.)

We took Shotgunit Lips to the most recent Chargers/Cardinals pre-season game tailgate. Nothing like testing out a new shotgun tool in a parking lot now that football season is here. We chose to test the Shotgunit Lips that includes beads although we also were sent a sample of Shotgunit Lips without beads so that you can attach them to a key ring.

As you can see in the photos, the key is to insert the tip gently and slowly. You don’t want to jam it in there hard and fast. That will create a lot of foam and splash back. The point on the back end of the Shotgunit Lips is sharp enough that a gentle push will easily puncture the can wall.

Once you have inserted the Shotgunit Lips all the way, make sure to keep the can tilted horizontally until you are ready to shotgun. Place your lips on the Shotgunit Lips while the can is still tilted. The pressure of your mouth on the Shotgunit Lips will push the plastic all the way in. There is a rubber seal that will press against the side of the can to make sure the beer flows through the hole and not overflow around the lips.

Chug, chug, chug until the beer is gone as you would a normal shotgun. Remove the Shotgunit Lips from the can and hopefully you will be conscientious enough to recycle the empty. As you can see in the photo below, the size hole the Shotgunit Lips makes is quite adequate and would be the perfect diameter had you been opening a hole the old fashioned and dangerous way.

Shotgunit Lips does what is sets out to do; it makes shotgunning safer while it is still fun and effective. For that we will deem it “Tailgate Approved”.

The only criticism of the product we have is that it is a bit more expensive than the other shotgun tools out there on the market. The Shotgunit Lips without the beads is priced at $5.99 and with beads is $6.99. Compare that to the Shotgun Party Opener which is only $3.00 and is also a 4-in-1 tool that is a shotgun opener, a bottle opener, can tab lifter and a key chain.

As we also mentioned earlier, the puncturing portion of the Shotgunit Lips is quite sharp and only requires a little pressure in order to start the hole in the can. This sharp point could pose a problem if you chose to put it in your pocket. The sharp point could poke you in the leg and could be uncomfortable if it scratched your leg through your pants pocket.

All in all, we liked the product and will add it to our tailgating kit for future tailgate parties. If you would like to buy Shotgunit Lips for your next tailgate, the version without beads is available from Amazon for $5.99. If you prefer the version that comes with beads, you’ll need to visit the Shotgunit online store. Bead colors include gold, red, green, blue and purple and cost $6.99.

If you are into social media, feel free to follow them on Twitter @Shotgunit_, Facebook and Instagram.

Three girls playing cornhole while camping

Cornhole has been a traditional favorite at fairs, backyards and tailgate parties for generations. It’s also a firm favorite at children’s parties. Although there is nothing wrong with the standard cornhole game rules, there are some non-traditional games that you can play with a cornhole board that will help to keep the kids interested, and that can help them burn off a few of those energy calories that come with eating all that great tailgate fare you have prepared.

Here are three variations on the traditional cornhole game that can help to keep your kids playing with those bean bags for hours.

Slip and Slide Shooter

For those warm summer days, this variation will have the kids running off that extra energy and staying cool at the same time. The game is suitable for children who are old enough to use a slip and slide. To play the game, set up a slip and slide, and then set up your board half way to a third of the way down the slide. Each child is given a bean bag at the top of the slide. The aim is to launch the cornhole bag and to land it on the board or in the hole as the children slide past the playing board. Normal game scoring can be used. You can also use a simple scoring system, like one point for each bag that lands on the board, if the children are younger. One of the parents will need to keep score.

This variation can also be played in teams, with children from each team taking turns. A team scoring system can be used to work out the winning team. This style of play is great for high energy levels, and it also encourages the hand-eye coordination of the children. It is, however, only suitable for outdoor events, hot days and summer activities. Probably not the best for a tailgate unless you tailgate on grass and have access to a hose and running water to keep the sliding surface wet and slippery.

Round the Clock

Another great take on an ordinary cornhole game is to use a timer instead of using the traditional point system. This round the clock cornhole can be played with one or two boards.

For the single board variation, set up the bean bag board at the twelve o’clock position and use a marker to indicate the shooting position. Mark out a circle using markers. Divide the children into teams. One team has a chance, and then the next team has a chance, and the team is timed.

Start with one bean bag at the foot of the board, and one bean bag at the first shooter. The shooter shoots the bean bag at the board, and then runs around the circle to the board. The bean bag is collected, and then the shooter runs around the rest of the circle clockwise and passes the bag to the next shooter. This encourages speed and accuracy for the children, and gives them time to run off all that tailgate party energy.

A two team version can be played with two bean bag boards, one board set up at six o’clock and one board set up at the 12 o’clock position of the circle. Each team is given 4 bean bags. One team is positioned at the 6 o’clock board and the other team starts out at the 12 o’clock board. The teams then throw their bags at the board on the opposite side of the clock – in other words, the team standing at six o’clock throws to the board positioned at 12 o’clock and vice versa.

Once the team has thrown its bags, they race around the circle and retrieve their bean bags and throw again – at the opposite board. The game can be timed – the winning team being the one who scored the most points in the allotted time, or it can be based on the team to reach a specific point total. All team members must race around the circle in a clockwise direction to avoid collisions.

Pass the Bag

This rendition uses two boards and two teams. Set out the boards opposite one another. Use some of the bean bags to mark off distances between the two boards. Divide the children into two teams.

Each team will have one shooter to begin with that stand at the boards ready to shoot. One child stands at the each marker between the boards. There is one bean bag for each team.

When the game starts, the shooter shoots the bag. A parent keeps score for each team. Once the shot is taken, the shooter runs to the end of the line. The child at the end of the line takes the bean bag and runs to the child at marker one, and then passes the bean bag to the child at marker one. The child from the end of the line then stays at marker one while the next child takes the bean bag up the line – it’s like a relay race.

The game ends when one team has had all the children throw the bag; for smaller children or for older children, the team with the most score wins.

Whether you are playing traditional cornhole, or a newer version, cornhole is sure to be fun for the whole family.

(This is a guest post written by Jennifer Cantis, content creator for Baggo. Baggo carries multiple variations of cornhole boards, bags and accessories. Jennifer has been a avid cornhole player for 11 years and doesn’t plan to stop until she is the cornhole champion of the world.)

Hexa Beer Pong Cups

Posted by Dave On July - 26 - 2016ADD COMMENTS

Hexa Beer Pong Cups

Beer pong. Not quite as popular in the tailgating lots at cornhole but it still remains a strong No. 2 in the rankings. From Freezable Beer Pong Racks to Spinning Beer Pong Racks to Naked Pong to Floating Beer Pong Tables, there is a wealth of beer pong accessories on the market. Despite all of this innovation for the game of beer pong, for the longest time the cups used to play beer pong have remained the same. Until now.

As you can seen in the above photos, Hexa Beer Pong Cups have taken the traditional round cup opening and made a hexagon out of it. This way the flat edges can line up against each other and form a honeycomb. By reducing the gaps between traditional round cups, the playing surface is larger and increases the chances of making shots. Successful shots make for a faster game allowing more people to play in the same amount of time. Also, a faster game is preferable while tailgating based on the limited amount of time you have in the tailgating parking lot.

We had a chance to test out the Hexa Beer Pong Cups for ourselves and found them to be a great improvement on the game of beer pong. The photo gallery also shows that the Hexa Beer Pong Cups round bottoms allows for use with other existing beer pong accessories like the N-Ice Rack Freezable Beer Pong Rack and Spin Pong.

After putting the Hexa Beer Pong Cups to the test, they are definitely “Tailgate Approved”. Hexa Beer Pong Cups come in a sleeve of 50 that also includes five (5) pong balls.

Hexa Beer Pong Cups are available from Amazon.com for $9.99.

Product Review – The Hovergrill

Posted by Brandon On July - 22 - 2016ADD COMMENTS

0000055_deluxe-individual-hovergrill_300Earlier this week we posted our review of the Smokenator, and in that we disclosed that along with the Smokenator we also received a product called the Hovergrill. Due to the length of that review, and our thoughts about the Hovergrill we opted to do 2 posts instead of cramming it all into one.

During the boxing it was pretty apparent that the Hovergrill was a serious product, worthy of it’s own review. While it may look like a typical round grill grate, the difference is that it has collapsible legs that raise it several inches. By the way those legs can lock into place so there isn’t any worry of it collapsing if you do your part. In addition to this the construction seems top notch. The metal is of heavy gauge and the finish appears excellent. It’s tough to know how durable it would be over time, but judging by the construction I think it would probably outlast the grill.

The Hovergrill is meant to be used by stacking it on top of your existing cooking grate. This in theory allows you to cook more food at the same time than you would with one grate alone. Not having enough grill space is one of those issues that most if not all tailgaters will experience, and if this product can mitigate that it would be of huge benefit.

So to test the effectiveness of the Hovergrill I set out to make fairly large batch of chicken wing pieces. Just how many I don’t know due to being a dummy and not counting them, but let’s say it was around 50. I had room for some more, but since there weren’t many mouths it wasn’t necessary. The pictures should kind of given you an idea of how this all looked.

After about an hour I had a whole batch of really nicely cooked wings that were ready for saucing. By my standards this is a passing grade for sure.

While my test was a simple indirect cook don’t forget that since this product sits on top of the cooking grate use with the Smokenator is not an issue. This opens up a lot more space for smaller foods, an area where we felt the Smokenator excelled. I can absolutely seeing this thing being used to smoke those wings, or to make a whole mess of other appetizers. Or if you’ve got that early morning thing going, some of those sausage fatties that I made for the Smokenator review would be good here, and you could make multiples easily.

Not bad since this is another item that can fit inside the grill during transport and doesn’t take up extra space in your vehicle.

However, there are some things to consider when using the Hovergrill. For starters, it’s designed for a round Weber kettle of at least 22″ in diameter, not something that everyone will have in their tailgating arsenal.  There is nothing to say that it couldn’t work on a different grill but the chances you’d get it to work a smaller portable grill are pretty slim.  When using the Hovergrill, if you need to flip/turn any of the food that might be under it, you’ll want a place you can set it off of the grill. Also take care that you don’t place something too large on the Hovergrill because it’s a few inches (3.5) closer to the top of the closed lid that you may not be accustomed too. Furthermore, don’t overload it. While I have no concerns about the ability to hold a lot of food, you don’t want to do anything that clogs up airflow since that will mess with your cook. Just keep a little space between items and you’d be fine.   None of those things are knocks on the product, just things we felt you should know.

In short we loved the Hovergrill. It’s well made and it really opens up some options for a tailgate menu. Without a doubt the Hovergrill is Tailgating Approved. You can purchase individually or in a combo with the Smokenator if you choose. For more information you can visit www.Smokenator.com

 

 

The Smokenator

Posted by Brandon On July - 19 - 2016ADD COMMENTS

smokenator-grillI think it’s fair to say that the kettle-style charcoal grill is something of an icon in the grilling world. Not only is it a classic symbol of charcoal grilling, it’s easily one of the most affordable, and maybe more importantly versatile style of grill on the market. I’ll go out on a limb and say for the money it’s the best thing going. While many manufacturers have their own take on this design, Weber is probably the maker that most of us associate with the concept.

Kettle grill users know that not only can they crank out great burgers, steaks, and whatever else they want to throw over the fire, they also know that when set-up correctly their grill can work as a passable smoker. Sure it will likely never be as good as a dedicated smoker, but then again it’s probably better at smoking than a smoker is at grilling. But I digress…

We were recently contacted about testing a product called the Smokenator. This is a fairly simple device that aims to make the Weber kettle from an acceptable smoking device, into a much better smoking device. Naturally we were happy to give it a go and share our thoughts. The sample we were provided was their Smokenator 1000, I’ll be dropping the 1000 during the review, which is designed for the 22 inch kettle, but they do offer other models for the various kettle sizes. (Note we were also sent a sample of their Hovergrill product, but since it was not integral to the operation of the Smokenator we opted to review in a separate post which can be seen later this week.)

IMG_20160627_085523801First things first, the Smokenator is a simple design. It is basically some sheet metal that has been cut and molded to interface with the various surfaces of the Weber kettle. Also there are 3 holes in the top, 2 smaller round holes for access to the fuel and 1 larger rectangular shaped hole for the water pan. The included water pan holds roughly two cups of liquid.

Installation is super easy, just remove your cooking grate and place the Smokenator on the side of the kettle. You should be able to see how it interfaces with the tabs that hold the grate in place and the lower charcoal grate and make adjustments if needed. There is no anchoring or permanent modification of the kettle required. This is a huge benefit in my opinion because some, if not most, of us don’t have the luxury of taking several cooking devices on our tailgates.

The first test is purely to get a handle on how the Smokenator performs with an empty cooker and to see how easily we can manage the temps, or in other words a dry run.. This test was conducted by filling the Smokenator with 50 unlit briquets of standard Kingsford Original (Blue Bag) and 15 lit briquets of the same. Also used was 1 semi large chunk of pecan wood. The water pan was filled 2 cups of hot water (~165 degrees F), and 2 temp probes were placed in the cooker. One was on the cooking grate and one on the lower charcoal grate. You can see a narrative of the this test here, Smokenator Data – Sheet1.

A quick word about this type of cooking if you aren’t too familiar with it. There are many variables involved with maintaining a lower temperature like you’d use for BBQ cooking. The outside temp, wind, sun, precipitation will all affect the cooker temp. Also if you build too big of a fire in the form of too many lit coals you won’t be able to keep a low temp. Practice, practice, practice before you commit a lot of money in food costs and really get a feel for cooker temp otherwise you will be sorry. Even between my tests the environmental conditions were different enough to produce noticeable differences in cooker performance.IMG_20160628_123413119

My dry run showed a couple things, by hour 4 the fuel supply was considerably spent. This is likely due to the fact that I measured my temps at the grate levels and not at the dome. The dome temps are 10-20 degrees higher than the upper food grate per the Smokenator manual so my grate temps which were above the target mark in the Smokenator manual were much higher than the temps by which they based their calculations. If you’re cooking bigger food items you’ll want to refuel at hour 4 if using the Smokenator in the standard fashion. Possibly even sooner if the outside conditions require you to burn hotter.
While we’re on temperatures, notice the lower (charcoal) grate temp was much less than the upper (food) grate temp. If you’re planning on packing the cooker full of food you need to adjust for that bottom grate being much lower in temp. Also of note the fact that the temperature is lower on the bottom grate is a great sign that the Smokenator design really does make for a true indirect cooker. If you’ve ever tried indirect with charcoal before without some sort of holder you know sometimes keeping the coals where you want them can be tricky.

IMG_20160708_113813893The next test was to try a short cook to see how the cooker responds with food in the chamber. The first of which was a simple naked fatty. If you’re unfamiliar I’ll save you the risky Google and tell you what it is. A Fatty is a term BBQ for a smoked roll of ground meat, and the naked adjective means that it is cooked without anything more than some rub on the outside. I will disclose that the weather played some tricks on me with this one as a light drizzle began falling about and hour and a half into the cook. As I mentioned earlier weather is one of those variables that will really mess with your cooker temp. To compensate for the loss I made the decision to open the vents and try to shelter the cooker from the elements as much as I could without posing a fire hazard. This did help but the breeze, lack of sun, and rain really made this a much more difficult cook. I also believe the fatty might have still been a little frozen which made the internal temp just sit still for a long time.

Because this 2nd test was so full of variables that worked against the Smokenator I opted to conduct a 3rd test cook that would hopefully no
t have the same conditions as cook 2. Thankfully aside from a quick yet heavy downpour the 3rd cook was perfect. The 3rd cook featured not only another naked fatty, but also a bacon cheeseburger fatty made with a bacon weave and ground chuck.IMG_20160708_120626541

One thing that became pretty apparent with each cook was that the Smokenator requires some periodic attention to function at peak performance. As you replenish the water take the time to stir the coals using the included rod. You’ll knock the ash off the coals and keep them exposed to the air for better combustion. It’s also a good idea to consider adding more fuel if you expect to be cooking for longer. I wouldn’t do this every time but maybe every other water refill.

Thinking outside of the instruction manual another thing you could do would be to remove the water pan and either use it on top of the grate or use a different container altogether. What this accomplishes is that you’ll have more room for fuel in the Smokenator and, if you chose a larger water container, less frequent filling. You could alternatively omit a water pan entirely, but this comes with the downside of reducing humidity in the cooker as well as foregoing the benefits that the water lend to temperature control. I think I’ll likely tinker with things over time, but as long as the person doing the cooking knows what is what it shouldn’t pose an issue.

I’ll cut to the chase. Is the Smokenator “Tailgating Approved”? Yes it is. While it’s not the only way to go about the task, it absolutely allows you to easily, and maybe more importantly, temporarily modify your Weber kettle into a suitable smoker. Does it have some limitations? Sure, but if you know them you can easily work with or around them. The model 1000 we tested for the 22″ kettle comes in right around $70, but other options are available for some of the other kettle sizes.  For more info on the 1000 or the others you can visit Smokenator.com

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TailgatingIdeas.com is a tailgating blog dedicated to bringing you the latest and most intriguing tailgating ideas out there. Whether it is the latest tailgating gear reviews, a great new recipe or a funny list to make you smile, our goal is to inform and entertain the avid and the casual tailgater alike.

Started in August 2007 by tailgating enthusiast Dave Lamm, TailgatingIdeas.com has evolved into an advocate for tailgaters rights and is not afraid to touch on controversial issues confronting those who frequent the tailgating parking lots.

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